How to Plan an Awesome Vacation (Spoiler: Wine is Involved)

Yippee!!  For many people, it’s time to start thinking about vacation!!  Time to start researching places, flights, accommodations, things to do…putting together this year’s adventure of a lifetime!  I  cannot wait to get started…who is with me?  Anyone????  

Ok, ok, so I get it…trip planning can feel like the equivalent of an avalanche barreling down on you at a 100 mph.   But boy, I do love to plan a trip and, like any good type-A personality, I have a process for adventure planning.  By the time we are airport bound we have a game plan to be excited about and fewer things to be stressed about.  

Going on vacation is supposed to be fun and (IMHO) so should planning the vacation!  It should be the big anticipation builder that gets everyone excited.  So grab a glass of wine and let me share a few of my tips & tricks that should make planning your next vacation (at least a bit more) exciting!


I created a Vacation Planning Workbook to help you plan your perfect getaway.  Grab your free guide below, add a glass of wine and plan away!  

Vacation Planning Guide Download


Step 1: Choosing Your Trip  

So the world is a pretty big place, which brings up the question, how on earth (pun intended) do you pick what corner should be explored?  So the first thing to decide, in conjunction with your vacation sidekicks, is what type of trip you want to have.  This is a big topic for us each year when we start to plan vacations.  We spend a lot of time chatting about what we want to experience with our trips which helps to narrow down the target locations.  Exploring all the options can be pretty fun!     

I pulled together a list of questions that are good vacation exploration conversation starters.      

arrowQuestion 1: What type of trip are you planning?    

  • Family vacation
  • Couples trip
  • Boys or girls trip
  • Romantic getaway

arrowQuestion 2: What is the length of the trip?

  • Weekend/long weekend
  • Week
  • Two weeks or longer

arrowQuestion 3: What types of location(s) is preferred?   

  • City
  • Small town
  • Mountains
  • Beach

arrowQuestion 4: What regions of the world are preferred? 

  • Africa
  • Asia
  • North America
  • South America
  • Central America
  • Caribbean
  • Europe
  • Middle East

arrowQuestion 5: What are the weather and timing preferences?  

  • Warm weather
  • Cold weather
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Fall
  • Winter  
  • High season
  • Low season   

arrowQuestion 6: What type of accommodations are preferred? 

  • All-Inclusive Resort
  • Cruise
  • Hotel/Motel
  • AirBnb
  • Adventure accommodations: camping, camper car, tree house, boat, etc.

arrowQuestion 7: What types of experience(s) are you interested in?     

  • Road Tripping
  • Chilling in one place  
  • Adventures seeking: Hiking, biking, yoga, boating, paragliding, etc.
  • Relaxing: spa, pool, reading, etc.
  • Cultural activities: Museums, historic monuments, theatres, etc
  • Foodie experience: food tours, unique local cuisine, cooking courses, wineries, distilleries, microbrews
  • Educational experience: Learning a new skill or hobby such as a foreign language or organic farming
  • Fashion & Shopping: Checking out the latest in the fashion world

arrowQuestion 8: What is the budget?

  • Luxury:  Going all out of this trip and expenses are not a primary concern.  
  • Comfort: Travel in relative comfort but no need to be extravagant.
  • Budget: Watching the dollars and it’s more about the experiences.

Being on the same page with your travel sidekicks for what you want out of your vacation is important.  These are the types of questions that will impact the destination you choose and the itinerary you create.

Tip to Make it Fun: One fun idea is to host a tapas and wine evening with your fellow travelers, print out this list and have everyone fill it out.  Then compare and see what commonalities everyone has to help pick a destination!  

Right now, I am planning 3 different types of trips:

  • Norway: This trip is to celebrate my hubby’s 50th birthday.  He prefers adventurous and active vacations (most people need a vacation from his idea of a vacation). Since his birthday is in February he wants to ski in a new and exciting location. His travel style is minimalist, off the beaten path, authentic experience with local people and culture.  Because we travel a lot and want to stretch our travel dollars as far as possible, we tend to vary between budget and comfort.  
  • Ireland: This trip is for my sister and brother-in-law to celebrate my sisters 40th birthday.  They want a road trip that will allow them to see all the well-known sites of Ireland in a zippy and sporty convertible.  One of their hobbies is making beer so they want to take a tour of pubs and sample plenty of pints.  They want this trip to be between Comfort and Luxury budget because they don’t travel as much and are celebrating a big birthday milestone!  
  • Amazing Beach Destination (TBD): This is a girls trip that will be a long weekend to celebrate the 40th birthday of one of the best friends of my sister and me.  She wants a relaxing and gorgeous beach location that is a new destination for the 3 of us.  She doesn’t want to think too much and come home feeling recharged and refreshed for life with her toddler.  Our budget for this trip is comfort.

So you can see how planning the details of these from accommodations, transportation, food, and activities will be very different.  If I tried to plan any of these vacations without this info it would likely just turn into wasted time.  But now that I know, I am full steam ahead to present viable options to the travelers.  

Step 2: Verify Travel Document Requirements

If this is your first trip abroad, check out this earlier post on Tips for Traveling Abroad the First Time

So once you pick the destination of your adventure, if traveling abroad there is the (not so minor) detail of travel document requirements.  While it has not happened to me, I have had several friends get to the airport only to discover they could not get on the plane because their international travel documents were not in order.  Literally a vacation killer!  

Both the US and Canada enjoy some of the highest travel flexibility in the world. However, you should still always verify the requirements before booking your dates to ensure you have plenty of time to get your documentation together.        

arrowPassports: Of course if you don’t have one…get one.  But in addition, many countries have a time frame for accepting passports that are close to expiration.  Usually, this timeframe is within 3 – 6 months of expiration.  However, it does vary by country so make sure you double check the expiration date on your passport and the window of acceptance of the country you are visiting.

arrowVisa: Especially important if your trip is for an extended period but even if a shorter trip it is always a good idea to check out the requirements.  If a visa is required make sure you take into account the timing and requirements of the foreign government before purchasing airfare.  This is a helpful website for checking the visa requirements by always double verify with official government websites for latest information.  

arrowImmunizations: Check the requirement for immunizations for any country you are traveling to so that you get them timely and have the medical to take with you as proof.  This US CDC site that is easy to use when determining what vaccinations you may need.  

Step 3: Creating a budget

If you are not high rolling on this vacation, consider creating a budget.  Ok, so for some maybe  a bit over the top type-A, but I find it to be a stress saver for:

  • Managing expectations on how much money will be spent and how it will be spent.
  • Providing transparency to everyone funding the trip which can be especially important if you are traveling with people who will be splitting costs.  
  • Alleviating financial anxiety while on vacation.    

Tip: Making a budget can double as a tiebreaker.  In the past, when torn between destinations a budget helped us make the final decision.   At least I find this to be a better decision-making method than a rousing game of Rock, Paper, Scissors.  

So what to include in a budget?  Well, this CPA (that would be me!) is more than happy to help out with that (you could call it my expertise :-)!   

arrowArrival and Departure Transportation: Cost of airplane tickets, train tickets, or gas if driving your car.  

arrowDestination Transportation: Some typical expenses can include rental car and gas, public transportation passes, or even train/plane tickets if you are location hopping.  

arrowAccommodation: Cost can vary vastly depending on where you are staying, but also can have a big impact on your vacation experience.  Typically this is where the balancing act between cost and desired experience can be the most tricky.  So check your options across hotels, AirBnb, hostels/guesthouses, campsites, campervan etc. to determine where and how to stay for your vacation.  

arrowEntertainment: Cost of places you want to visit, events you will attend, or activities/experiences you want to have.  These can add up quickly so if you are in a situation of picking and choosing knowing cost could help with making a decision.   

arrowFood & Alcohol: This is one expense area that can sneak up on you since eating is pretty much required regardless of which corner of the earth you are in.  Especially if you are on a budget this is also one area where you can have the most control. For example, opting for an AirBnb with access to a kitchen can really help control costs by cooking some meals as opposed to always eating out.  

arrowCell Phone Plan: If traveling internationally it is likely that you will need access to your phone and if you are outside of a major city, relying on wifi could be tricky.  For more information on cell service when traveling internationally, check out this earlier post.

arrowSouvenirs: Plan for any shopping or keepsakes you want to bring back with you.  I have this one in here because there is nothing I love to say more than “Oh this…I got it at this great little boutique in Paris”.  I just need to know if I am planning to spend $100 or $1000 on this adorable piece of something before my “shopping spree” begins.

Tip: If you are traveling with others and splitting expenses there are some great apps that keep track of split costs and allocates to each party, eliminating stress over who owes what.  At the end of the trip, it is much easier than digging through a pile of receipts.  I have used both Splitwise and Share-a-Bill apps and can recommend either since they function similarly and are easy to use.

Step 4: Booking a Flight

Booking a flight can be one of the most stressful parts of the trip.  Forever in search of the perfect combo of price and itinerary, hours can be spent hunting the perfect flight.  

arrowTrip Timing:  Having flexibility in your trip timing can be a big price saver.  So if you have flexibility take into account:  :

  • High Season vs. Low Season: Not arriving at the peak of high season will help to minimize cost not only with the plane ticket but often with the whole trip. Plus you don’t have to battle all the crowds!
  • Day flexibility:  Fares can vary drastically by day and most sites will let you compare prices on flex days (or if they don’t find use another site).  There have been many times we have saved several hundred dollars just by flying a day earlier or later than our initial plan.   

arrowFinding Affordable Flights:  Ok, so this might be the task that is the most dreaded (me included) but can save some serious $$$ in the travel budget.  A new discount air tracker is always popping up, but some of our favs right now are:

  • Google Flights: So easy to look at pricing months out, easy to compare price by destination, and they aggregate across most of the airlines.  Plus they have this cool “I’m feeling lucky” feature that will randomly select a place (I love seeing what they come up with).
  • Momondo: One of the most popular flight and pricing aggregators currently out there, another great option for flight searches.
  • Kiwi: We just used this site to book our Norway trip and we ended up paying 50% less than originally budgeted by being flexible on which days of the week we flew.
  • Airfare Sale e-Mail lists: Ok, so this is possibly one of the coolest ways to stumble upon an unexpected trip or even find an awesome fare on a planned trip (like we just did with Norway!).  I totally recommend signing up for them:
    • Scott’s Cheap Flights: My current fav, so easy to use and I love to see what places drop into my inbox daily.  I currently use the free subscription but am likely going to upgrade to the premium because the cost is nothing compared to the potential savings.
    • Delta Flash Sales, Air Canada Destination Offers (or whichever airline you hold frequent flyer miles or can use credit card miles).  I had a friend just book tickets on Delta to Turks & Caicos for 8,000 points round trip (that is seriously nothing!)
    • TPG, The Points Guy: Not only great tips on airfare but general tips on maximizing your travel dollars and experience.

While we mostly travel on Delta and Air Canada and have status perks, we are not so loyal to them or their partner programs that we will pass up an awesome airfare on another airline (some travel-holics are stringent about it, but not us). So which camp you fall into is totally up to you, both have perks.

Step 5: Booking Accommodations

Choosing your type of accommodation has a huge influence on your vacation and just like buying a house the most important thing is location, location, location to keep you close to your activities and desired experience.   

  • Do you want the option to cook or no freaking way…you are on vacation it is someone else’s turn to cook!  
  • Have maid service each day or do you own tidying up?  
  • Sharing a room with others or opt for a bit of privacy?
  • Be easily accessible to your activities or commuting a bit isn’t a problem.

We don’t go all out on accommodation expense since we are not there to hang out in a room.  To fit into the flow of our vacation, the items most important to us are location, cleanliness, and price.  Like airfare, there are tons of sites/apps to find a place to stay. There are the traditional ones such as Expedia, Priceline, Trivago, or Kayak that are great for hooking you up with a hotel/motel/resort.  

But, to be honest, we rarely stay in a traditional hotel/motel setting when traveling.  There are too many unique experiences to have so I rarely use those sites for finding accommodations.  Instead, apps/sites we love are those that allow us to discover hidden gems:

arrowAirBnb: We love AirBnb because unlike any hotel or resort it allows you to live amongst the locals.  Plus you can customize your vacation including experiences, pricing, amenities, and accommodation type.  By renting a house, private room in a house, or shared room in a house you get an experience that is more authentic, local tips & tricks from your host and save money.  We have never had a horrible experience (sure some were better than others) with AirBnb and as early adopters of the concept have been using it for years.  

AirBnb Tip: Always read the property description and rules for any place you are considering reserving.  Read at least a sampling of the reviews that were left by previous travelers.  These are the best ways to ensure that you are aware of what your experience will be like.  Also, always leave a review after your stay.  AirBnb is a social platform that relies on feedback to make sure that future travelers have a great experience too.  

arrowBooking.com: So amongst the plethora of hotel/motel aggregators and booking sites things I love about this site include:

  • I have never found another site that beat their pricing
  • Once your account is set up booking is super easy (account setup is easy too),
  • Just in case it is needed, the cancellation is generally crazy flexible.  The site is super clear about the property cancellation policy before you book and they even send an email reminder when the cancellation deadline is coming up (seriously cool, right?).
  • Not only does booking.com have hotels and motels they have smaller local accommodations as well such as B&Bs, hostels, and guesthouses.  

By pairing AirBnb with Booking.com, we get the full range of accommodations available to us.

Tip: Before booking a location use Google street view to check out the neighborhood.  This is great for getting a sneak peek at the surrounding area for your home away from home.

Un-Ordinary Vacation Tip: Some of the best vacations can be adventure accommodations such as a camper car to hop from place to place, camping in really cool places, staying in a tree house, or renting an airstream on a beach.  If you are at all interested in checking out vacation with a bit of a twist check out the options on AirBnb, people have come up with some really inventive ideas!

Croatia Camping
Camping on the Adriatic Sea in the Croatian Dalmatian Islands. Note to self: zip the tent and hide the mess next time 🙂

Step 6: Destination Transportation

Whoo Hoo!  Vacation is booked, flights, accommodations, and you have lots to see and do.  You just have to figure out how to get from place to place.  Of course, your need for transportation is going to depend on your vaca itinerary.

arrowPublic Transportation: I love a city with good public transportation…LOVE, LOVE, LOVE.  It makes it so easy-peasy to get around a city quickly, efficiently, and affordably.  These days navigating public transportation almost stress-free.  Most large cities have their own public transportation apps, so between those and Google Maps this can be a no-brainer way to move around a city.  Before leaving read up on the city’s public transportation options and how to buy passes once you arrive.    

arrowBicycle: Sightseeing on a bike is becoming a bigger and bigger trend in the US, but it has been popular in destinations like Europe for many years.  I also love a city with a bike rental system.  These systems allow you to rent bikes for short-term periods either for free or minimal cost.  You can pick up and drop off a bike at stations around the city (a concept the same as a bus or metro stop).  If you are up for a bit of exercise, the weather is great, and you want to see the sites from behind handlebars, check to see if this option exists in your destination.  Most cities will have an app for the bike system so using it is simple.

Tip: If you love the idea of exploring a place on a bike but your destination does not have a rental bike system, then look for local bike shops that rent bikes.  

London Bike
Zipping around London on a city bike!

arrowRental Cars: For hopping from town to town the first option that comes to mind is renting a car.  Before renting a car abroad read up to find out if an International Drivers License is required in the country(ies) you will be visiting.  It is always helpful to read up on driving laws as there are always differences and they are not always posted (or even if they are, not easily decipherable).  Our preferred sites for getting the best deal on rental cars are RentalCars.com and Kayak.  Also, to get the best rates it is advisable to book in advance.

arrowBuses, Planes or Trains: Other options for town hopping in some destinations, such as Europe, are buses, planes, and trains.  Often very affordable if purchasing a “local” ticket there is also usually lots of flexibility with timetables.  My favorite is to tour an area by train.  Not only is it relaxing, it is a bit romantic/nostalgic to sit back with a glass of wine and watch the passing countryside.  If in Europe my fav app/website to use for booking is GoEuro, which allows you to compare prices and times across all three transportation methods.

Nice Train Station
Hopping the train from Code d’Azur to Paris

arrowScooter/Vespa: Ok, so this might be a bit personal but I am Vespa OBSESSED.  O.B.S.E.S.S.E.D.  So obsessed I bought one for home because it makes me feel like I am on vacation when I am zipping around on it in the summer (not the best transportation option for winter since I live in Canada).  However, if you are in a destination, such as Europe, where scooters are a common transportation method and you are comfortable driving one, do it!

Tuscany Italy Vespa
My first time driving solo on a Vespa and in Tuscany, Italy. After all, isn’t Italy the perfect place to learn to drive a Vespa?

Step 7: Things To Do (Explore!  Explore!  Explore!)

Rarely on vacation is the problem boredom and a question of what to do (or if it is you should definitely be re-thinking your vacations).  Instead, it is tough decision making on what won’t make the cut.  At least that is usually how I feel!  The excellent news is that there are so many great ways to get feedback and suggestions from those who have already “been there, done that”.  This type of feedback can remove some of the guessing game and make the decision process a bit easier.

arrowSocial Media: Find travelers with similar interests to yours and discover their “can’t miss” suggestions:

  • Blogs: Awesome resources for more in-depth information and pics on places to see and do.  Most bloggers also usually include tips and tricks that are sooo helpful to know before you get there.  
  • Instagram: My favorite social app for travel purposes, especially now that you can follow hashtags.  Follow travel Instagram accounts and hashtags for your destination to get lots of amazing pics and plenty of ideas for places to add to your itinerary.     
  • Facebook: Use the “Looking for Recommendations” capability to get feedback from people in your network who have already made the same voyage.  I am usually surprised at how many of my peeps have already traveled to the same place and have great ideas.   
  • Pinterest: Search for your destination, then create a beautiful board to pin all of the things you would like to do.  What is really great about Pinterest is that you will continue to get suggestions on new items for your board.    

arrowOfficial Tourism Websites: A great way not only to check out the best things to do, but also a great resource for price checking activities (including finding the free options).  

arrowTour Companies: For activities you can’t do on your own or would be a better with an experienced person check out local tour companies.  I do highly suggest reviewing cancellation policies and checking reviews before purchasing.  Tripadvisor is great for checking out reviews and selecting a tour company.

arrowOther Apps: Some great apps that I like for checking out suggestions on things to do are Culture Trip and Google Trips.   

So now you should have a list of all the awesome and cool things you want to do.  If you need to narrow it down you now have the budget and time information you need to make decisions.   Even for things that don’t make the final cut there is good news!  Your adventure will still be exciting and now you have Instagram and Pinterest to live vicariously through for the missed items.    

Old School Travel Tip: Even with the easy access to fantastic travel information online I do still love to buy the travel book (Fodors, Frommers, Lonely Planet, etc.) for a few reasons. First is that it is a great souvenir that makes me happy when I see my bookshelf with all the books from my travel destinations.  Also, it is nice to have a book with you to follow along with on your trip, especially if you are in areas where wifi is not always reliable or accessible.    

Do It All Tip: Since there is never time to do it all, there are two “typical tourist” activities we like to do!  Insert image of a person with a camera around neck, phone on selfie-stick, following a person waving a flag here.  But potentially embarrassing tourist activities aside, we find these great for getting a city overview (confession: it is pretty fun too)  

  • Bus Tours: On the first day, take the tourist bus to get a good overview of the whole city.  This is perfect if you only have a short amount of time in a place or to map out the places you like best and want to go back later on your trip to explore more in-depth.      
  • City Pass: If there are a lot of popular attractions you want to visit, many cities offer a “city pass” or a “city tour” that you can purchase.  This often gives you access to the most popular attractions at significant discounts.
New York City Bus
Playing tourist on the NYC Blue Bus with my sisters! It was my youngest sister’s 21st birthday and we took her to NYC for the first time. Since our time was limited we wanted to make sure she saw it all!

Step 8: Create an Itinerary

Now that all the pieces of your trip are done, you are ready to organize into an itinerary. An itinerary for helping to make sure you are doing items close to each other on the same day (as much as possible), deciding which days to purchase any advance tickets, and prevent from wasting ½ of each day in the “So what do you want to do?” ritual.    

But my best vacation tip:  Be flexible!  Give yourself some space for that “can’t miss” place you discover, or for the plan that doesn’t go perfectly and requires some an on-the-fly revision.  Take this bit of advice coming from a self-confessed Type-A personality who loves a well-made plan!  Now…go have a fabulous adventure!


If you have not downloaded the Vacation Planning Guide to help you plan your getaway now would be a perfect time!   

Vacation Planning Guide Download


bon voyage

P.S. If you have any trip planning hacks you want to share with me, I would love to hear them!  Leave in comments below or send me an email.

P.S. x2  As you get a bit closer and it’s time get the final details done, check out these blog posts for tips on making sure all goes smoothly as possible.  

Packing Tips and Tricks

Tips and Tricks for Packing a Carry-on Bag

Tips for Traveling Abroad

Planning Your Iceland Trip

Iceland is a unique trip for most people so preparing for it can be a bit baffling.  Before our trip we were fortunate to get immensely helpful tips and tricks from friends who had previously visited.  So I am combining those with the tips and tricks that we learned during our trip in hopes that this will help with the question “What exactly do I need to know about Iceland and what in the world do I pack?”  

Related Post: Road Tripping Iceland in 7 Days

Tips & Tricks (i.e, Stress Relievers)  

Those little things you wish you knew before you arrived that might make your trip just a bit smoother.

Currency

The local currency is the Icelandic Krona, but worry not because money is super easy over there.  In fact, we didn’t have cash at all during our trip because literally everywhere accepts credit cards.  Even the bathroom stalls (and you do have to pay for some of them!).  This is likely because there are some very isolated areas where ATMs are not available and you would be stranded without a card.  However, make sure that your credit card providers are aware of your travel plans.  You will be swiping a lot and you definitely don’t want to be cut off.  For more tips on foreign currency check out this prior post.

Budget

Iceland is notoriously for its high prices for some basics such as food and drinks. But with a bit of planning this trip is very affordable.

1. Plane Ticket Budget

Getting to Iceland from the US or Canada is really affordable.  If you watch prices it is very easy to get a round-trip ticket for $400 or less on WOW airlines.  What I also love about WOW is that you can schedule a layover in another European city for no extra cost.  So you may want to consider slipping in another destination for a week or two!

2. Food & Alcohol Budget

While the flights to Iceland can be a steal, once you are there it is notoriously expensive. However, with a bit of planning it should not be an issue.  Some of our fav ways that we saved $$$:

arrowAlcohol:  While alcohol prices in Iceland can make you want to jump on the bandwagon for the duration of your trip, there is a solution!  Purchase at duty-free and stuff it in your carry on.  We each purchased 2 bottles of wine and those 4 bottles lasted us all week.

Tip: If you are bringing bottles or wine or plan to buy bottles at the grocery store once you are there, don’t forget to throw a corkscrew into your suitcase.

arrowFood: Usually I love to experience the local cuisine and while we ate dinner out a few times we considered this to be an adventure trip instead of a gastronomic trip so we saved a lot of money by being creative.  

  • Breakfast:
    • We bought a variety of breakfast bars and foods with us.  
    • The traditional Icelandic yogurt, Skyr, is super good, affordable, and can be picked up at any grocery store or gas station.
    • Look for guest houses or hostels that include breakfast with their rate.  We stayed at a few places that included breakfast and found it to be quite good.
  • Lunch & Snacks:
    • Like breakfast bars, bring along snack foods like crackers or granola bars in your suitcase.
    • Find a grocery store during your trip and stock up on sandwich items, fruit, and other items that are easy to eat in the car.    
  • Dinner: We did eat dinner out a few times and if you love fish you definitely want to try some since this is one of their specialties (usually caught right off the side of Ring Road!).  But the rest of the time this is how we rolled:
    • Stayed at AirBnB’s or Guest Houses that had a kitchen so we also cooked easy things such as pasta.  
    • N1 Gas Stations are affordable with a surprising array of food such as salad bars, pasta bars, soup, hamburgers, etc..  In some of the tiny villages this is only “restaurant” around so you will see lots of locals there as well.   

Tip: You CANNOT leave Iceland without eating at least one bacon wrapped, cheese hot dog.  Yummy!

Rental Vehicle

Renting a car is pretty much required in Iceland if you want to leave Reykjavik. In fact, Iceland is pretty much a road trip vacation.  The terrain is very rough on cars and the rental car companies are super stringent about any damage to the vehicle.  Honestly, this was one of the biggest sources of stress on our trip.  So if you don’t want to spend 80% of your car time (and there is a lot of car time in Iceland) freaked out about the state of the car, 2 things to splurge on:

arrowAdditional Insurance: At a minimum buy the gravel, wind and volcanic coverage because the risk is real.  We received the same advice before we left and still debated it at the rental car counter but ultimately went with it.  And once on the road, we were so happy we did because it did alleviate some of the driving stress.     

arrowGet the 4X4:  Always the budget travelers we opted for the economy car and ended up with a Nissan Micra.  Cute but definitely not practical even for parts of the Ring Road (we didn’t drive on any F-roads).  We were chasing hubcaps several times as we bounced over parts of the roads (some of our funniest memories but still I don’t recommend it).    

Tip: Many of the roads on the interior of the island are referred to as F-Roads and it is illegal to drive on them unless you have a 4X4 but even then they are known to be quite dangerous.

We were lucky that even though we were missing a hubcap we were not charged additional amounts for car damage.  We heard several people telling horror stories about paying thousands of dollars due to damage.  I promise you both of these will take a lot of anxiety out of your trip.

Micra at Pjofafoss Waterfalls
Our adorable Nissan Micra at Pjofafoss Waterfalls. It was a cute car, but we wished we had opted for the 4X4 even though a bit more expensive. Note our missing rear hubcap 🙂

Cell Service

Iceland is very well connected and there are mobile hotspots everywhere to make connecting to google maps or searching for information on the next destination easy. Even so, though there are remote areas (especially in the North) without wifi.  We both purchased the Verizon travel pass on our phones which at just $10 per day was really affordable.  Check out your phone providers options, but generally, this is pretty easy in Iceland.  For more info on international cell phone plans check out this prior post.

Tip: Even with travel passes on our phones in some of the more remote areas the signal was not always reliable so be prepared with knowledge of your route just in case.

Other Tips & Tricks

Language

Icelandic is the official language but not to worry because nearly everyone speaks English.  Which is a relief because while it is lovely to listen to them communicate in their language, it is not one you are going to master in time for the trip.  As hard I tried I was never able to pronounce a word the same way twice.

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This pretty much says it all when it comes to trying to understand the Icelandic language in time for your trip. This t-shirt made me laugh each time we saw it in a gift shop.
F-roads vs. Paid Tours

Many of the interior roads on the islands are called the F-roads and it is illegal to drive on them without a 4X4.  So if you think you want to venture into them you most definitely want to upgrade the rental car to a 4X4.  However, if off-road driving is not your cup of tea even with a 4X4 (like ours) there are plenty of tours that can take you into some of the amazing interior portions of the island.  

Car Time

There is a lot of car time involved in an Icelandic vacation getting from place to place.  A lot and especially in the north.  The good news is that it is beautiful and lots of opportunities to stop and stretch your legs.  But be prepared for hours in the car between locations (such as downloading any audible books, podcasts, or music playlists in advance).

Chargers

Iceland is in Europe so make sure to bring along converters for charging your devices.  Since there is so much car time this can be a great time to charge up all your devices.  In addition to phone car chargers, a charging pack like this could come in handy for multiple devices or even for charging a.  

What to Pack

You will be spending most of your time in the car or doing outdoor activities so if I had to pick 3 words for packing for an Iceland vacation it would be: warm, casual, comfortable.  I strongly advise against packing cute/go-out clothing because you really won’t have an opportunity to wear them and will wish you had used the space in your suitcase for something more practical.  Everyone you see is going to be dressed similarly so unless you are going out for a night on the town in Reykjavik anything other than comfy outdoor gear and you will be wayyyy overdressed.  

arrowLots of Layers: You will be shedding or adding clothes between sitting in the car and getting outside to explore.  Plus depending on the sunlight it can get “warm”.  So layers of shirt, sweater, and a jacket is definitely recommended.

arrowCold weather accessories: Hat, gloves, scarves, and socks (warm and at least calf length)  

arrowBase Layers – Merino wool base layers are the best, but any base layers that you have definitely bring along.

arrowRain/Wind Gear: A jacket that doubles for both rain and wind protector as well as an umbrella.  It rained the whole time we were there and many areas are very windy. But even if you are lucky enough not to encounter rain you will be getting close to a lot of waterfalls and so the rain jacket comes in quite handy on a daily basis.  

arrowCold Weather Jacket: Down jackets are really the best, but regardless of material you will want to have a warm jacket, especially in the winter.  It can always come off if needed.  We were there in late September and with the rain and chilly weather we often wore our rain jackets over the top of our cold weather jackets and that kept us comfortable.

arrowMaterials: Cashmere and wool are the best cold weather materials to keep you warm so pack those if you have them!

arrowHiking Boots/Shoes: Not cute, fashionable wanna be hiking shoes but durable comfortable hiking shoes (and they can be cute…I have a very cute Salomon pair). Unless you are just poking your nose out of the car to observe (and I certainly hope not) you will be doing lots of walking over rough terrain.  And the area around waterfalls is really slippery so you want a good grip.

arrowBathing Suit – While you are not likely going to jump in the ocean you most definitely want to slip into at least one hot spring while you are there!

arrowTowel – This definitely comes in handy if you are going to stop and dip into hot springs.  Even at the larger lagoons/hot springs the towel rental can be expensive (around $5).  Plus depending on your accommodations towels may or may not be included.  I threw in a camping microfiber towels from REI which is super thin and fast drying making it perfect.

arrowMap of Iceland – Throw it back to 1995 and bring along an old-school map of Iceland.  Audrey brought one along this Michelin Map and it came in quite useful a few times because when cell service was under 3G our GPS was not always reliable.

arrowCamera – This is one of those vacations that would be perfect to turn into an animated flip book because just about every square inch is a photography dream (whether you are a novice or a pro).  So make sure to bring along your photography equipment (camera, tripod, or other fancy schmancy stuff you have).  For some vacations your phone is enough, but for Iceland you will really want that camera.

arrowFood & Such – Don’t forget to add any food items or corkscrew that you are opting to bring along.

arrowToiletries – Add a packet of tissues or wet wipes to your toiletries along with a ziplock bag.  There can be long stretches of road without access to a restroom so if you have to stop on the side of the road you will be really glad you have these (and you do not want to leave behind any litter).

Bonus Pro Tip:  Car doors can double as privacy shields if you have to make an emergency roadside stop.  

Tip: If your itinerary is going around Ring Road and moving accommodations every day or two remember that you will be hauling your suitcase out of the car and repacking A LOT.  I definitely recommend packing as light as possible.  If you can find guesthouses or AirBnB that has access to a washer and dryer this will also help you limit what you need to bring. By packing just 2 outfits each we were both able to get everything in a carry-on suitcase.  For more on packing light, take a peek at this earlier post.  

Planning Your Trip

Iceland 2017 Map
Kerri & Audrey Iceland 2017 Itinerary, Route, and Places Visited

So I am just going to put it out there…you won’t be able to do it all.  I am convinced you could live there and not do it all.  There are infinite things to do and to this day I still see amazing pics on Instagram of all the things we missed and I am green with jealousy.  So while everyone puts together a “Top 10 List” keep in mind that is from their trip and they probably missed all kinds of things too.  Just driving down the road in Iceland is an experience and you will want to stop every 2 miles (seriously, just wait and see).  

We booked our trip last minute and we stayed in Iceland only for a week and once we started planning realized that we should have gone for a minimum of 10 days (really 2+ weeks is more ideal).  However, those were the tickets so we did some mad planning!  You can go here to see that places we visited in Iceland.

arrowRing Road – This is the road that circles the whole island and will be the primary route for your journey.  Many of the more popular tourist attractions are in the south (like Golden Circle), which means most people depart Reykjavik taking Ring Road south. However, because of our chosen itinerary, we actually did the opposite and departed Reykjavik going northwest.  

I recommend starting with the Northern part of the island first and working your way to the south because it is more scenic in this direction.  How do I know this you ask?  Well, interesting story!  When we were 60% around the island a bridge on Ring Road collapsed due to rain and that section of the road was closed for the duration of our trip.  We had to turn around and drive all the way back around the island to get to the southern part. We lost a day of our trip, but we were able to see the island from both directions and we found north to south to be more beautiful.

arrowAccommodations – Outside of the main cities and some of the larger villages the typical hotel in Iceland is scarce. Most accommodations are Airbnb, Hostels, or Guest Houses.  I love these types of accommodations because you get a chance to meet more locals or interact with other visitors to Iceland since you are often sharing a common living space.  

For booking this trip Airbnb and booking.com were great resources for finding affordable accommodations almost anywhere on the island.  

Tip: While I often take trips where my accommodations are not booked in advance I would recommend (at least on the first trip to Iceland) booking in advance.  Rooms can be limited in some villages or a long distance outside of a village.  We were there in a low season so there were open rooms, but in high season this could be a challenge.  But also be flexible, you never know when you may run into a car or nature issue and requires you to change your plans without notice.

Other super-cool accommodation options that are available are camper vans and tent camping.  While we did not do that on this trip I have done both of these in prior vacations and had a blast. I highly recommend them as a great way to have an adventure vacation.  Iceland has a lot of campgrounds in which you can have both a camper van and a tent.  My next trip to Iceland will likely involve a camper van.   

Iceland Cheat Sheet
Iceland Cheat Sheet – This is a pic I snapped at the airport when we arrived. Its stuffed full of good info about Iceland that we referenced several times during our trip! It might also help you pick the time of year you want to visit!

Most Importantly…Have Fun!

Best of luck with planning an amazing Icelandic adventure and if you have any questions send me a note and I will help out as much as I can!  Or on the flip side if you have an Icelandic tip or suggestion send it to me so I can add to the list (with reader credit of course).

bon voyage

P.S. To check out our Icelandic adventure, visit this blog post: Road Tripping Iceland in 7 Days.

Road Tripping Iceland in 7 Days

As one of the current hotspots for travelers, Iceland had my curiosity piqued and it was on my travel list.  But to be honest, it was not at the top.  As someone who already lives in 4 -5 months (minimum) of winter, I usually want to go to sunshine and warmth for vacation, not in search of more cold.  However, one of my girl travel sidekicks, Audrey, had it high on her list and when we both started itching again with the travel bug and airline tickets were crazy cheap for both of us, the deal was sealed!

Preparing for our Iceland trip was an adventure in and of itself.   So I wrote an accompanying piece about our lessons learned and tips & tricks to help you with planning a fabulous Icelandic adventure if you want to jump ahead!  

Our Iceland Adventure

Beautiful, otherworldly, spectacular, rugged, jaw-dropping…just a few descriptors that come to mind when trying to describe Iceland.  Despite rainy weather, missing the island’s east side and the Highlands due to an unexpected bridge outage (what is an adventure without a few unplanned mishaps), and losing some missing car parts (oops!) our seven days there exceeded all our expectations.  (You can read a bit more about our mishaps here in the next blog post about planning your Icelandic adventure)  

I can’t wait to share with you what we discovered!  

Northern Iceland

Kirkjufell Mountain

Located on the Snaefellsnes Peninsula next to the village of Grundarfjordur, Kirkjufell Mountain is said to be the most photographed mountain in Iceland.   The view of the mountain is stunning from the road, but I recommend taking the very short walk up to Kirkjufellsfoss waterfall where the view is spectacular.  As a photography hotspot, definitely expect to encounter tons of cameras and tripods, especially at sunset with the backdrop of the sunset and when the northern lights are on display in the winter.  But this should not keep you from visiting if you are in this area of Iceland.

Kirkfujell Mountain Iceland

Godafoss Waterfalls

Over 98 feet wide Godafoss Falls translates to “Waterfall of the Gods”.  According to local legend, when Christianity became the official religion of Iceland in the year 999 – 1000 a pagan priest threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall after converting to Christianity.  We stayed nearby one night and the falls were so gorgeous we visited twice! 

Iceland Godafoss Falls 

Husavik Village

One of the best places in Iceland to whale watch the small village of Husavik was founded in 870 A.D.  According to the Icelandic Sagas, Gardar Svavarsson was the second Scandinavian to reach Iceland and founded the village after his ship was stranded by a storm and he was forced to spend a winter here.  When he departed, he left behind some of his party who settled the village.  But he was so inspired by Iceland that he did return.

Husavik Village

Since neither of us had seen whales up close and personal in the wild, we decided to take a whale watching tour.  While spotting a whale is not guaranteed, we had 7 sightings of Orca whales!  This expedition had us both giddy with excitement and can definitely recommend if you are on the fence about taking one.

Audrey Whale Watching
In addition to seeing whales who wouldn’t want the chance to strut around in this awesome outfit for 3 whole hours!!

We used Gentle Giants for our whale tour and I have to say they were amazing!  I am sure the other tour companies are also great, but we really enjoyed our tour and the staff was so friendly and let us pepper them with questions!  We learned a lot during our voyage about whales and their habits.  For instance,  did you know what the underside of the tail of an Orca is unique to the whale like a human fingerprint?  These unique markings are used to identify whales and track them all over the world.

Orca

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

Lake Myvatn (& Surrounding Area)

This massive volcanic lake that was created approximately 2300 years ago when a volcano erupted.  It is a huge nature habitat with some many different experiences that it would be possible to spend several days here alone exploring.  We did spend the majority of a day exploring but reluctantly had to leave to keep with our itinerary. Recommend stopping by the visitor center in Reykjahlid where they are awesome at helping you figure out what to go see based on your interests.   

Lake Myvtan

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

Star Power: Apparently many scenes from Game of Thrones are filmed in the Myvatn Lake area so they may look familiar to some.  However, I am apparently one of only 7 people on the planet who has never seen an episode so it was all new to me!

Grjotagja Cave (Lake Myvatn)

The lava cave has an underground that for many years served as a bathing pool but was closed in the 80’s due to the temperature of the water rising above 50 degrees Celsius (122+ degrees Fahrenheit).  However, it seems that as of recently it may possible to bathe it again depending on the temperature which would be awesome!  So that might be worth checking out if you are visiting the cave.

afterlight    

Not to be missed is the view from the top of the caves which has a large fissure dividing the ground and an amazing panoramic view of the mountains and you can even see steam rising off of the geothermal pools in the distance.

Grjotagja Cave Top

Namafjall Geothermal Area (Lake Myvatn)

Also known as Hverir this area has a spectacular array of colors created by sulfur crystals and boiling mud pots.  It feels like you are stepping out of your car and into the planet Mars.  You can walk around in this area and there is even a small hiking trail.  Friendly warning: There is a very strong sulfur smell but it’s totally worth it and besides you start to get used to it after a few minutes.  

Namafjall Geothermal Area

Dimmuborgir (Lake Myvatn)

Called the Dark Fortress of Myvatn, Dimmuborgir is a massive lava rock formation field that was created 2300 years ago when molten lava for the volcanic explosion flowed over a pond.  The formations were created when the water that was trapped beneath the lava turned into steam that escaped through vents in the lava.  You can wander through the formations by following the paths that have been created.

Dimmuborgir at Lake Myvatn.jpeg

Hofdi Peninsula and Kálfastrandavogar Lava Pillars (Lake Myvatn)

One of the few places we visited that was full of gorgeous vegetation and trees, the Hofdi Peninsula has beautiful walking trails that provide spectacular panoramic views of the lake.  The peninsula also provides the perfect way to see the free-standing Kálfastrandavogar lava pillars.  These free-standing pillars were created the same way as the Dimmuborgir formations.   

Hofdi Peninsula & Kalfastrandavogar Lave Pillars

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

Icelandic Highlands: A total of 40,000 sq km the Icelandic Highlands is one of the largest uninhabited areas of Europe and has some of the most amazing beauty in Iceland (such as Landmannalaugar and Hekla Volcano).  Due to the unfortunate Ring Road closure while we were there we lost our day to visit Landmannalaugar but we did drive through a small slice of it between Husavik and Hofn.  The rugged, uninhabited beauty is just…wow and at the top of my list for my return trip (yup, that is definitely going to happen).    

Iceland Highlands

Southern Iceland

Golden Circle

One of the more popular tourist areas in Iceland you can expect to share space with a lot of people (in contrast to the hours you can spend on the road with few signs of other people).  However, it is popular for a reason and so we spent a day exploring it and the surrounding area.  Despite the numerous selfie sticks (I have an abnormal hatred of selfie sticks), it was worth it.

Gullfoss Waterfalls (Golden Circle)

A 2-tiered phenomenal waterfall and is one of the most powerful waterfalls in the world (more powerful than Niagra Falls!).  And to add to the mystical beauty of the waterfalls rainbows are created by the mist and sunlight. In fact, Iceland is full of rainbows so if you are looking for a pot of gold this is a good country to search.

Gullfoss Waterfalls

Geysir Geothermal Area (Golden Circle)

Several well-known geysirs are in this area, including Great Geysir.  Since it has been dormant since 1926 the chances of seeing it erupt are pretty slim.  But not to worry because it’s neighbor, Strokkur Geysir, erupts approximately every 10 minutes and has a trajectory of 66 to 132 feet so it’s pretty impressive to watch!

Strokkur Geysir

Kerid Crater Lake (Golden Circle Area)

Formed around 6,500 years ago this crater is almost perfectly oval and its beauty comes not just from the gorgeous blue of the lake at the bottom, but also from the rocks of red and orange along with the colorful vegetation that grows within the crater.  Kerid is on the way to the Golden Circle so definitely worth swinging by on your way.

Kerid Crater Lake Iceland

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

Note: There is a nominal fee of just 500 ISK (around $5 USD and $6 CAD), but don’t let this deter you!

Fridheimar Tomato Farm:

Ok, so not a site but definitely worth a visit, because one has to eat after all, right? Fridheimar is a tomato and cucumber farm that grows their produce in these amazing and gorgeous greenhouses that are kept warm by the geothermically heated water.  So pop in and have possibly the best tomato soup and Bloody Mary’s in the world (seriously, in the world).

Fridheimar Tomato Farm

Pjofafoss Waterfall

Our most off the beaten path site that we visited.  We were not sure the Nissan Micra would survive (Audrey had to convince me a few times not to turn around).  However, put this under the “Totally worth it even if we could have driven off a cliff” checklist.  We arrived at this waterfall just as the sun was setting and we were the only people there. This is why I love the path less traveled; it is when you find the most spectacular treasures.

Pjofafoss Waterfall

Seljalandsfoss Waterfall

Located right off of Ring Road it is one of the highest waterfalls in Iceland at 60 meters (197 feet).  One of the really unique things about this waterfall is that you can walk behind it into a small cave with the water tumbling down in front of you.  Super cool, but make sure you wear a rain jacket and hat because you will get wet (but completely worth it).

Note: You do have to pay a nominal fee to park and see the falls.  Pay at an automated machine with a credit card.  Don’t just park alongside the road to avoid paying because they are pretty aggressive about giving tickets (and they should be).

Seljalandsfoss Waterfall

Secret Lagoon Hot Springs 

Located in the small village of Fludir and dating back to 1891 the Secret Lagoon is the oldest swimming pool in Iceland.  While it is far less crowded than Blue Lagoon, it is not quite a secret anymore and you are likely to be sharing the pool with other people.  We were there at night, but it does have a feeling of being in nature and you can sip on a wine or beer while relaxing in the cozy waters enjoying the night sky.   

Secret Lagoon.jpeg

Drangshlid

Right off the side of Ring Road, a series of houses and barn embedded into the bottom of a mountain that has a lot of elf folklore surrounding it.  Elves or no elves these old houses are charming.

Drangshlid

Reynisfjara Black Beach

One of the most famous of Iceland’s black-sand beaches due to several unique formations.  The first of those is the basalt columns.  This unique column wall was formed as a result of the cooling and cracking of thick basaltic lava flow at the surface.  

Reynisfjara Black Beach - Kerri

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

The second is the Reynisdrangar lava formations off of the shoreline.  According to legend, these are actually two trolls that were trying to pull a ship out of the ocean but were caught by daylight, turning into stone.  

Reynisdrangar Lava Formations

And finally, the basalt column cave which you can slip into for a unique view of the basalt columns.     

Kirkjufjara Black Sand Beach

Black sand beaches are a result of the lava flow from volcanoes but may not actually be sand!  They can also be small black pebbles and these pebbles are quite beautiful. Kirkjufjara has several lookout points with very different views and both are quite stunning.

Kirkjufjara Black Sand Beach

Blue Lagoon

We were on the fence about visiting Blue Lagoon due to many reviews that thought it was overrated, expensive, and too touristy.  However, in the end, we decided to go to the Blue Lagoon because it would be the equivalent of not going to the Eiffel Tower when in Paris.  So we literally hit it up on our way to the airport and we were both so glad that we did!  We purchased the base level tickets, each bought one drink, and we were able to keep the cost reasonable.  But it was an amazing experience and while there were lots of people there, we didn’t find it to be overcrowded as they control the number of people allowed to enter.  Plus our skin was super fabulous after the silica mud mask that is included with the ticket (and we both splurged for the algae mask for an extra $4). However, the state of our hair with all that silica in it after flying back home and letting it air dry was a completely different matter.  I should have taken a selfie cause it was a pretty…ummm…unique look!  

Blue Lagoon Iceland

Photo credit of Audrey Ann Photography.  Follow Audrey on Instagram

Iceland Bonus

One of the most famous things about Iceland is its horses.  While they are smaller than the typical horse we are used to don’t you dare call them ponies.  Once you see them you will know why…they are gorgeous and majestic, and regal.  More importantly, they are friendly, love people, love being pet, and are everywhere on the island!  So make sure you stop (and stop often) to give some attention and love to these beauties.

Icelandic Horse

Until Next Time Iceland

And there you have it!  That is our journey through Iceland.  It’s like stepping off the plane into a whole other planet.  And it should have been higher on my bucket list.  I will definitely be back because there is so much left to explore due to our short trip, rainy weather, and missed the eastern side of the island. But it’s ok…because now I have lots of reasons to return!   

All the places we visited and our route are shown on this map, but if you have specific questions feel free to ask!

Iceland 2017 Map
Kerri & Audrey Iceland 2017 Itinerary, Route, and Places Visited

Iceland or Bust

So I am starting my must-see list for next time and I will keep adding to it as I discover more!  I am sharing with you in case they are places you want to check out as options for your trip.  If you have any “you just can’t miss this” places send them my way to add to my “Iceland or Bust” return list!

Western Iceland

  • Western Fjords
  • Lóndrangar Cliffs

Eastern Iceland

  • Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon
  • Northern lights
  • Vatnajokull National Park
  • Klifbrekkufossar Waterfall
  • Bustarfell Red Houses

Southern Iceland

  • Thingvellir National Park
  • Fjallabak Nature Reserve: Landmannalaugar and Laugahraun Lava Fields
  • Myrdalsjokull Glacier Park
  • Take a Glacier & Ice Climbing Hike
  • Fjaðrárgljúfur Canyon

Next Post: Preparing for a Trip to Iceland

If you are anxious to start planning your trip to Iceland and want some insider “been there done that” advice compiled from our trip visit the blog post Planning Your Iceland Trip.

bon voyage

Packing (Wine Optional)

I get questions regularly from family and friends on how to pack since I have evolved into a semi-pro.  Since I am packing for a 2.5 week vacation I thought this would be the perfect time to share my process.  This particular trip includes stops in DC, North Carolina, and a tour through California from San Fran to San Diego.  And I managed to pack in carry-on sized suitcase.  Full disclosure: this does not include cycling clothing & gear as that gets packed in the bags with our bikes but it does include my other “stuff” for the 2.5 weeks!

Minimal packing is a skill.  Seriously, I wish I had learned it years ago as I get flashbacks to my first trip to 10-day trip to Europe in which I took two massive suitcases that covered every single possibility that might occur and proceeded to haul them through planes, trains, and automobiles.  Across multiple countries.  And countless walk-up apartments in Europe.  This is the trip where I became intimate with packing regrets.  

In the many years since my packing style has been forced to evolve.  Forced.  

arrowReason 1: Years of being a business traveler made over-packed bags obnoxious. Especially when everyone else I was traveling with had carry-on luggage and had to stand around baggage claim impatiently waiting for my bag to arrive.  And then when I did have a carry-on I had to be sure I could lift it into the overhead compartment without giving an innocent bystander a concussion.  

arrowReason 2: Multi-week cycling trips in Europe in which we literally had to carry all our possessions on bikes from location to location.  The very first time I went on one of these trips and my hubby announced that I could only take 4 outfits for 2 weeks (2 cycling outfits, 2 regular outfits) I almost had a meltdown.  And you can just imagine what he said about my items for my daily beauty routine.  Our relationship almost came to an end over this discussion…but as usual in the end he was right.

And let’s be honest…I usually didn’t even use 50% of what was in my suitcase.

So after coming to grips with my ridiculous packing habits, I began to hone my skills in minimalist packing.  It took some trial and error to get it right…leaving out things I really did need and bringing things that I still didn’t use.  Today I am pretty good at efficient and minimal packing. I spent 3 months living in France in just one regular sized suitcase and a super small carry on (really backpack with wheels for my weekend excursions).  Even I was impressed with myself.  But I used everything I had and because of picking mix and match pieces never felt deprived with my outfit selection (and a few purchases in French boutiques helped :-).

arrowClothing

  1. Pick things that mix and match.  Everything should be able to be part of a least 2 outfits if not more.  So pick your colors and patterns carefully.  For example as my packing came together for this trip I ended up with a navy, off-white, and black theme with a few pops of color added by tank tops, scarves, and accessories.   
  2. Myth: Lose the idea that you can’t wear an outfit more than once during a trip.  Yes you can. Just plan the when carefully.
  3. Myth: You don’t need multiple outfits per day unless there are special events going on.  So pick clothing pieces that are versatile between activities.  
  4. Workout clothes take up a lot of space so be honest with yourself…are you really going to use them on this trip?  If you are definitely pack them, but if it is an overnight work trip jam packed with commitments you could probably save the space that those shoes will take.
  5. For longer trips, if possible choose an AirBnB or hotel that has easy access to a washing machine so that you can easily wash undergarments and work out clothes.  That means that you don’t have to pack multiples.  I generally keep a small packet of laundry detergent in my bag in case I have access to a washing machine (which sometimes turns out to be the bathroom sink in a pinch)
  6. Shoes, shoes, shoes.  Still my biggest challenge.  I just can never have enough shoes but gosh they take up sooo much room.  So keeping it to 2 – 3 pairs can be tough but this is where outfit coordination can also come in handy.   
    1. Formal Shoes: 1 pair of dress/work shoes or 2 if a multi-day trip.   
    2. Comfortable Shoes: Generally flats but something good for lots of walking in airports or events outside of work.     
    3. Flip-flops: Thin and bendable so they don’t take up much space but usually they are needed for hotel rooms.  Some people do pass on these but I have seen too many hotel rooms not to.  Or perhaps in the summer months or warm locations flip-flops and comfortable shoes can do double duty.
    4. Sneakers: If you are going to work out or perhaps these are another option to perform double with your comfortable shoes.  

Tip: To save space, if possible stuff the shoes with things like socks or tights.  Not only does this help keep the shape of the shoes it saves tons of space!

  1. Warm layer: Often it is necessary for a warmer layer in the plane, mornings and evenings.  So try to pick one scarf, jacket or sweater that will look nice with every outfit because like shoes they take up a lot of room.

arrowBeauty Items/Toiletries

I keep a permanent bag of toiletries ready to go so I just have to move it around between suitcases and never spend time putting it together.  This has been one of the practices that really lowered my stress for packing so I highly recommend it!

Tip: Buy a clear TSA compliant bag that you keep everything in so that you can just grab it and throw it in the security bin if carrying on your luggage.

arrowLiquids: Lotion, body wash, shampoo, conditioner, hair styling products, skin care products, toothpaste.

Tip: Regardless of if you are checking luggage or not the 3 oz rule is a good one for liquids to also minimize space.  So invest in lots of bottles and keep them full of your must have liquids.
Tip: Even though hotels usually have items such as body wash and lotion I still always transport with me for simplicity so that my toiletries bag does not have to be changed each trip.  Plus sometimes they just don’t and I am not willing to sacrifice my moisturizing routine.

arrowBeauty Routine: My on-the-road and at-home beauty routines vary.  My on-the-road routine is much simpler with fewer steps to save time and space.  However, If you are like me you are not willing to compromise on things such as skin care so find a good, but simpler set of beauty products for travel.  At home I use Rodan & Fields but when I travel I use the Josie Maran argan oil products.

Tip: Pick multi-functional products as much as possible.  One of the reasons I love the Josie Maran line is because in addition to simplicity they are also multi-functional.  I use the classic Argan oil as moisturizer for my face, hands, and lips but I also replace my Moroccan Oil hair product with the Argan oil and it works fabulously.  

arrowHair Styling Equipment: These take a lot of space so think about if you can substitute yours with the equipment from the hotel.  If you are staying in accommodations that don’t offer these items then pack as few as possible (do you really need a dryer, curling iron, and straightener).  Or if you travel enough I really suggest investing in travel size items.

arrowSuitcase Readiness

There are things that I just keep in my suitcases at all times so I don’t have to worry about forgetting them:

  • Umbrella
  • ID tags
  • Lint Roller
  • Dirty Clothes bag

arrowGeneral Tips

arrowIf you have a trip coming up that is creating packing stress (seriously, it’s a thing!) start pre-packing in advance, especially for big trips.  This way you can add items to the pile and take away as you change your mind.  When I recently took a trip to Iceland and was only taking a small carry-on I began pre-packing 2 weeks in advance as ideas came to mind.  When it was time to pack I just threw it all in the suitcase and zipped it up.  Bonus: No stress at all and I didn’t forget anything critical or pack anything unnecessary!

arrowKeep a master packing list so that you don’t have to recreate a list each time you travel desperately making sure you didn’t leave anything off.  I have multiple master packing lists depending on the types of trip: Business, Vacation, Camping, etc. and I cannot tell you how much easier they make my life when getting ready for a trip.

arrowIf you can’t carry it don’t pack it.  Seriously.  Do a weight test on your luggage before you walk out the door and if you cannot lift it enough to carry up a set of stairs…de-pack something.  Big mistake is to assume that someone will help you with it and then before you know it you in the metro station, after midnight, stuck at the bottom of the stairs because the escalator is broken and you have to figure out how to climb 57 stairs with a suitcase that feels like Shamu is stuffed in it.  Been there done that.  Not fun.   

Honestly packing is no one’s favorite activity and it creates stress, anxiety, bad moods, and excessive wine drinking.  So anything that eliminates stress is awesome because no one needs to start an important work trip or a fun vacation as a stress ball.  Minimal packing provides so many benefits that for me it is a no-brainer.  Easy-peasy to get around with my bags, daily outfit selection much easier each day when you have minimal choices, and you get to be creative and stretch your wardrobe limits!  

If anyone has any tips that make their packing process just a bit easier would love to hear them so I can steal them for my process and add to this suggestion list for others.

P.S. For anyone wondering how I survive 2 week cycling trips with only 4 pieces of clothes…there is a secret.  After my first melt down over the 2 outfits for 2 weeks rule my hubby gave me a compromise.  After the trip was over he would take me boutique shopping to buy new outfits.  DEAL!  Oh and I lose the hair routine…completely lose it…I refer to this time as “hair-cation” where anything can and will happen with my hair style.

bon voyage